Wed, Jun 02 | Križevniška Church

Post-Corona Sun, Penduluming

Site-specific multimedia installation (assemblage of recycled found lace, plexiglass sculpture, sound, light)
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Post-Corona Sun, Penduluming

Time & Location

Jun 02, 10:00 AM – Jun 29, 4:30 PM
Križevniška Church, Trg francoske revolucije, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

About the Event

Throughout December and the first half of January, the former church of the Teutonic Knights in Ljubljana, part of the Križanke complex, will be the venue for a transmedia installation by Eva Petrič entitled Post-Corona Sun, Penduluming. The ambient installation, consisting of an assemblage of found and recycled lace, plexiglass sculpture, sound and light, reflects the artist’s perception of the world and humanity at a crossroads as it transitions into the post-coronavirus age. The Post-Corona Sun, which consists of 350 pieces of handmade lace, either donated or found at flea markets around the world and now recycled, and the figure of the Earthman on a Pendulum that hangs in front of it, wrapped in twists and loops of Idrija lace, illustrate the intertwined and interdependent nature of everything and everyone on this planet. The monochrome coils of Idrija lace that form the plexiglass sculpture of the Earthman illustrate the interweaving of emotions in every individual and the connection of individuals to wider society, to the whole, where each individual part is dependent on the whole and the whole is dependent on its individual parts.

“We are more connected and interdependent than we realise,” believes the artist. “When one thread breaks, all the others vibrate.”

“The figure of the Earthman, which hangs like a pendulum in front of the Post-Corona Sun in the crossing of the church, indicates our current position in the midst of the coronavirus crisis, when we have to choose a way forward. It is set into oscillating motion, like a request to indicate the right direction, by the sound Touch, which emphasises the importance of touch for the preservation of our humanity. The value of touch, which unlike images and sounds cannot be digitalised and transmitted virtually, is something we are probably only really becoming aware of now that we are all too frequently deprived of it.”